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I Vore You
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I totally forget what that is. I can remember almost everything else except this. I'm sure I will remember it, but right now, I have no idea.
 

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Shine on Rick Wright
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alright cellular respiration is an aerobic process (uses O2) that converts glucose into ATP (usable by the cell for cell work)

The overall equation is: Glucose (C6H12O6) + 6O2 --> 6CO2 + 6 H2O + ~36 (+/- 2) ATP

Do you know the ATP Cycle?

basically there are 3 stages in CR. In order:
Glycolysis
Krebs Cycle
Electron Transport Chain (ETC)/ATP Synthase action

If that doesnt kick in the memories let me know and ill go into 5 pages worth of detail ;)
 

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oh snap
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It's the exact opposite of photosynthesis. We just did a photosynthesis chapter in Bio a couple weeks ago, but didn't talk about cellular respiration much.
 

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Yea, we just finished PS/CR a few weeks ago in my hr bio class as well....i really like sciences tho, so if your too lazy to open your book ill try and help you out.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
DragonFire0729 said:
alright cellular respiration is an aerobic process (uses O2) that converts glucose into ATP (usable by the cell for cell work)

The overall equation is: Glucose (C6H12O6) + 6O2 --> 6CO2 + 6 H2O + ~36 (+/- 2) ATP

Do you know the ATP Cycle?

basically there are 3 stages in CR. In order:
Glycolysis
Krebs Cycle
Electron Transport Chain (ETC)/ATP Synthase action

If that doesnt kick in the memories let me know and ill go into 5 pages worth of detail ;)
I know a little bit about glycolysis. Pretty much that it doesn't require oxygen, that it makes 2 molecules of pyruvate (which are used in the Kreb Cycle right?), has a net gain of two ATP (four made, two consumed). I don't understand what Wikipedia means by:

The initial phosphorylation of glucose is required to destablise the molecule for cleavage into two triose sugars. During the pay-off phase of glycolysis four phosphate groups are transfered to ADP by substrate-level phosphorylation to make four ATP and two NADH are produced when the triose sugars are oxidised.
I don't understand the Kreb Cycle at all and I understand the ETC pretty well. What takes the molecules off of the glucose molecule in the ETC? What are they molecules of and where do they go? I think the hyrdogen carriers take the oxygen molevules off the glucose molecule, leaving a carbon skeleton. Am I right? And later on the hyrdogen carrier takes 2 oxygen electrons and 2 oxygen protons and makes 2 molecules of oxygen and then forms water, right? What happens inbetween the hyrdogen carrier combines the electrons and protons and when the hydrogen carrier brings the molecules of oxygen to wherever they go?

Thanks.

-Mike
 

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I Vore You
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DragonFire0729 said:
alright cellular respiration is an aerobic process (uses O2) that converts glucose into ATP (usable by the cell for cell work)

The overall equation is: Glucose (C6H12O6) + 6O2 --> 6CO2 + 6 H2O + ~36 (+/- 2) ATP

Do you know the ATP Cycle?

basically there are 3 stages in CR. In order:
Glycolysis
Krebs Cycle
Electron Transport Chain (ETC)/ATP Synthase action

If that doesnt kick in the memories let me know and ill go into 5 pages worth of detail ;)

Blah, you covered most of what I can remember now. It's been a while since I learned this stuff.
 

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Ok, im going to break it down and just tell you the straight up facts with no interpretation, you can ask questions if you need.

My apologies for starting at square 1, but then i can refer to this for any more CR questions in a year or so :D

CR Step 1, Glycolysis



You begin with 1 glucose molecule. Now, there is an initial 'investment', if you will, of 2 ATP (Adenisine TriPhosphate, which can release energy when broken into ADP+P, then with an input of energy be reformed into ATP, hence the ATP Cycle). Using that energy, the Glucose is broken into half, giving 2 3-carbon molecules +P.

Then, electrons and hydrogen ions from those 3 carbon molecules are transferred to NAD+, making it NADH. The 3-carbon molecules are now 3 carbons+ 2P

Now, each of those can produce 2 ATP (net gain of 2) and glycolysis ends with 2 Pyruvic Acid molecules

Step 2 The Krebs Cycle



In the Krebs cycle, which starts with 1 Pyruvic acid (so it happens twice per glucose) most of the rest of the energy is taken out.

3 H2o are added to the PA, which then releases a CO2. NAD->NADH happens again, leacing acetyl coenzyme A (Acetyl CoA). the Acetyl CoA is then bonded with a 4 carbon acceptor molecule, and the end result of 1 Krebs cycle is:
  • 2 Co2
  • 1 ATP
  • 1 FADH2
  • 3 NADH
The 4 carbon receptor stays, and can be reused. This happens twice (so multiply the list x2) for each glucose.

Step 3 ETC and ATP Synthase



Energy carried in NADH is transferred into the ETC, where energy produced as iif flows down the ETC pulls H+ ions across and it is stored up (Dam analogy).

When the energy reaches the end, and has very little energy, it is bonded with water. The built up H+ ions flowing across the ATP Synthase provide the energy to create ATP from ADP+P. In all, ETC/ATPS create ~34 ATp

That makes the overall production of ATP:
  • Glycolysis: Net of 2
  • Krebs: 1+1=2
  • ETC/ATPS: up to 34
So the total amount of ATP produced for 1 glucose can be as high as 38.

What do you need?

btw, pics are copyright 2004 Pearson Education
 
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