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I have my internet going from my wall, to the little router box thing, and out of the router to my xbox. The router is just kind of being used as an extention(because i dont have a cable long enough), im not actually using the wireless for my xbox. But when i try to play xbox live with my friend, we'll be playing, then itll freeze for a few seconds, then itll quit out because of a connection problem im assuming. need to know if i just need to get a longer wire and connect straight into the wall, or if my connection is just bad.
 

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Yeah wireless routers will greatly slow down your internet connection. Wired is the fastest/only way.
I'm not saying your wrong because I really don't know, but why would this be? If the wireless connetion is 54mb/sec or more, which is faster than the internet connection is, why would it make internet slower than an ethernet connection into the router?
 

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Try turning on your microwave. That always makes for fun times.
What does this do?

My dad has the microwave on right now and I lost my internet connection (I am on neighbors)

Are these two things related or does my router just suck?
 

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ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTFU
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They are related. I don't have wireless, but at my friend's house it would mess up the internet every time someone would use it.
 

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I'm not saying your wrong because I really don't know, but why would this be? If the wireless connetion is 54mb/sec or more, which is faster than the internet connection is, why would it make internet slower than an ethernet connection into the router?
I know this isnt the only reason, and it may not be the most substantial, but heres one major difference:

With wired, you are transferring energy through electrons from one end of a piece of metal, to the other end of a piece of metal. Both contacts are making physical contact, and its generally speedy.

Wire wireless, you have to add 2 more steps onto what happened in the above example. A wire goes into the wireless router, where it is most likely encoded, then the signal is converted into code and sent via radio to a connected device. There, it gets decoded and sent out through another wire as output.

Then you have to factor in packet loss... If the connection isn't good enough, some of the packets that get sent via RF won't be 'loud' enough for the receiving piece of equipment to 'hear'.
 

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alpha's right. 5.2 ghz is the new craze, that's only with wireless a and g (i think g to, not 100% on that.) anyways, microwaves operate on the 2.4 ghz range, and so do a lot of cordless phones, along with a (it can run on either 2.4 or 5.2, i think) b (2.4) and g (5.2). if you have an overlap of other devices (a lot of phones now run on 5.2 ghz, ironically, because they were interfering with wi fi)then you gotta either turn the wi fi off or turn the other devices off.
will edit with correct info.


Edit: 802.11a uses the 5 ghz range (usually 5.2). 802.11b/g use the 2 ghz range (usually 2.4). 802.11n is the dual band (not 802.11g, as previously stated) and can use either the 2 ghz or 5 ghz band)
 
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