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Curious of the weight, size and weight distribution of the rotor, prophecy, and halo too. I know they are all reliable and feed plenty fast enough but curious of how they compare physically.
 

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Rotor is the lowest profile. Halo Too has the same profile as the HaloB/ReloaderB/B2. Prophecy is wider than the Halo Too, but sets around the same total height. Prophecy Z2 actually sets lower than the Rotor (by a massive couple millimeters).

In terms of weight, the Rotor is the heaviest, with the Halo Too VERY close behind and the Prophecy a bit lighter. Z2 even a little lighter.

Weight distribution on the Rotor and the Prophecy is, IMO, ideal. They're both very bottom-heavy so it doesn't throw off your marker. Z2 also. The Halo isn't bad, but definitely not as bottom heavy as the other 2.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Sounds like the z2 is probably the better Hopper size wise. When I see picture of them they just looks so long, I personally don't like the looks. I always thought my too was kinda heavy but I guess that's just about what there weight is. My dm6 with full.hopper and 70/4500 tank feels heavier then my 98
 

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A DM6 weighs 1.02kg/2.24lbs with everything that's needed to allow the gun to fire, Stock UL barrel, stock Dye On/Off, and Hyper 2 included.
You've also got to add the weight of the hopper, paint, and tank.

It's all about how it balances though. Some setups feel better, depending on the length of the tank. Different hopper, distribute weight differently as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Its pretty even, just I expected it to weight like nothing, which the gun does. Didn't think 180 paintballs in a holler would make that big of a difference. Is a 70/4500 slightly heavier then a 20oz or is it just me?
 
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I can't speak on the prophecy - but something else to take into consideration is weight-balance.

The Too and B seem to place the battery weight towards the front of the nose - and the paint weight evenly over the footprint of the hopper. The feed neck seems centrally located. The result..to me...feels to be a front-heavy hopper that seems to push the nose of the marker downward.

The Rotor puts the batteries over the back of the hopper - almost over the grip area of any marker I own. The paint is pushed towards the front, and the feedneck post is front biased.

Personally - I prefer the balance and feel of a rotor atop my markers when compared to the Too/B.

...I'm probably getting a spire coming up - so I'll be able to comment on that soon too.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
My halo gets the job done and the weight distribution ain't bad, since I have a larger tank. Do stubbys have any advantage besides size? The prophecy seams great I just don't like the looks. How much better is the spire then the rotor? I would take the rotor just because of how it looks.
 
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I understand what we're trying to prove here - but in a CQB/Airball game...anything short of full-on scenario or multi-hour woodsy-woods game...how long is your hopper going to be full?

At most - I'd think within the first minute or so - you're going to have whittled your hopper down to the "1pod +/- 35 rounds" point.


When we compare gun weight- you're holding the gun the entire time you're playing - so its sorta an accurate assessment...much like tank weight (as it doesn't change much with the inclusion of 4500psi of air) But with something as heavy and as much of a liquid asset as paint?


If we were to do this - someone like Miller (who owns EVERYTHING paintball)...

Weigh the marker setup eith everything but paint ready to go. Load the hopper completely full. Shoot the marker to the player's "reload point". Reload. Discard all unused paint still in the pod or dropped from the hopper - and then weigh the marker again, subtracting the marker empty vs. full weight. This is your functional paint weight. Then weigh the hopper empty. add in the recently acquired paint weight, accept that there's going to be a small difference due to air actually having weight, and that would be the Hopper + Paint "max functional weight".


Or we can take a hopper - toss in about 100-120 rounds at random..and see how heavy they are.


Though - a lot of this is going back to "the rotor is 2.25 pounds. The spire is 1.75 pounds...and the PE Ego 15 is going to shave 2.16 ounces off marker weight with the new milling!! Unless we're Min/Max-ing we may just be doing experiments to do them. :)
 

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Or we can take a hopper - toss in about 100-120 rounds at random..and see how heavy they are.
well if it is going to be random we might as well just pull numbers out of our ass.

the Z2 weighs 6.3lbs
the rotor weighs -2.5lbs
and the spire weighs 5.67 tons

there done

assuming you are like me though you are starting a game with a full hopper (and if you get shot first ending as well) and with everyone asking how much each hopper weighs and assuming the lighter the better I think this is a useful piece of information, afterall if a hopper holds a few paintballs less it is going to weigh slightly less when on a marker and ready to go at the beginning of a game. so if you are looking for a light hopper, the hopper itself is only part of that equation
 
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Reasonable estimates exist within a reasonable range. I mean -if we want to be hyper scientific about this - we could conduct 400 trials of this per hopper and average the paint quantities - but wouldn't it just be easier to perform it once and know the results are going to be relatively close?

But again - I can cram 170 rounds into a Rotor at the start of a game, but after the first 8 seconds...unless its 100% empty..I'm hard pressed to get more than 140 more into it. Are we better evaluating a situation on ideals, or real world values? Is a solenoid that can cycle 85 times per second any better than one that can cycle 45 times per second in an environment restricted to 12.5 cycles? So - without a perfect storm situation (fully fully reloaded)- does that max-cap figure actually have value? What percentage of the time is that? Or are we better off taking the capacity of the hopper in a more functional situation and evaluating that?

After mulling over this again and again - I'd be interested in knowing 3 things about a hopper:

1) Can I fit a full 140 round pod in the hopper from a firing position.
2) The alleged hopper capacity.
3) The empty weight.

We reload in 130-160 round increments...so fitting 20-30 extra rounds only benefits me through the first 8-10 seconds of any game I play. If I'm ramping and playing tourney-style? that's ~3 seconds.


hmm...funny thought - Hopper capacity is a function of the capacity of a pod....sorta.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
In the end all hoppers are about the same. If all hoppers are about + or - .3 pounds of each other. After you fill them up with paint The lightest one may be the heaviest hopper do to amount of the paint it holds, and vice versa. After you fill them up and say there arond 5 pounds. Your not going to notice .2 pounds. Really all the it comes down to is profile and the reliability of the hopper.
 

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Reasonable estimates exist within a reasonable range. I mean -if we want to be hyper scientific about this - we could conduct 400 trials of this per hopper and average the paint quantities - but wouldn't it just be easier to perform it once and know the results are going to be relatively close?

But again - I can cram 170 rounds into a Rotor at the start of a game, but after the first 8 seconds...unless its 100% empty..I'm hard pressed to get more than 140 more into it. Are we better evaluating a situation on ideals, or real world values? Is a solenoid that can cycle 85 times per second any better than one that can cycle 45 times per second in an environment restricted to 12.5 cycles? So - without a perfect storm situation (fully fully reloaded)- does that max-cap figure actually have value? What percentage of the time is that? Or are we better off taking the capacity of the hopper in a more functional situation and evaluating that?

After mulling over this again and again - I'd be interested in knowing 3 things about a hopper:

1) Can I fit a full 140 round pod in the hopper from a firing position.
2) The alleged hopper capacity.
3) The empty weight.

We reload in 130-160 round increments...so fitting 20-30 extra rounds only benefits me through the first 8-10 seconds of any game I play. If I'm ramping and playing tourney-style? that's ~3 seconds.


hmm...funny thought - Hopper capacity is a function of the capacity of a pod....sorta.
i see what you are saying but the problem is some people are great at reloading and some are not, some have different sized pods, but if you take the weight of a completely full hopper, you are saying this is the maximum it will ever way (yes i know paint and batteries will differ slightly) its like the cerb weight of a car

on a side note, what paint are you using in a rotor? holy crap thats a small count. When i counted mine it came to 190, which is also why I am confused why people say it is too small
 

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standard size. i did cut out the 3 little prongs dye leaves on the inside from the manufacturing process but at best i am looking at 3 extra paintballs from that. but if i remember right that was after I did the count.

counted it full with paint down the feedneck (not on the marker) and lid closed, that is what was in it
 
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