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Taken from: www.endlesspb.com/tech/timing.html
This was not written by me and I take no credit for this. Awesome job to the person who wrote the article.

I found this and hopefully its helpful.

The first thing people want to know how to do to their autococker is time it. There is always fear and apprehension about the task, which is generally caused by popular misconception. With practice, timing your marker becomes no more difficult than putting on a barrel, or filling a hopper. If you are not familiar with timing your marker, I suggest that you read over the article to the end, and then come back and take it step by step. Its always easier to undertake a task when you know completely what you need to do. While this is a step by step guide to rather conservative timing, you can come back and pick and choose according to your needs at the time, and it will still work.


Back Block
The next step is to set the back block distance. This step sets the back block so that everything else can run smoothly. You don’t want the back block too close to the body, otherwise it slams into it, damaging both, and creating a ruckus. You also don’t want the back block too far away from the body because then the ram takes the brunt of all the forces being moved around. The best way to set the back block is to screw it into the pump arm, until it is flush against the body, then unscrew it one turn. This setup creates the best of both worlds. It doesn’t let the ram take the brunt of the force, but likewise doesn’t have the block unnecessarily hit the body.



Cocking Rod
The length of the cocking rod controls how much bolt clears the breach when the hammer lug catches on the sear. Of course, when the marker is aired up, you need the bolt to clear the feed tube. The best way to set this process is with the marker degassed. You need to adjust the knob on the back of the cocking rod to adjust how much bolt is visible in the feed tube. You want the tiniest sliver of bolt visible in the feed tube when the gun is cocked, and degassed. To adjust this, turn the knob on the cocking rod clockwise to make more of the bolt visible in the feed tube, and counter clockwise to make less of the bolt visible. The reason you want a small bit of bolt, is because if you have too much bolt, the ram ends up doing more work than it needs to, and has to push against an already compressed main spring. If you have none of the bolt showing in the feed tube, then the ram ends up pushing too far, and it could lead to double feeding, and basically just more work than is needed



Hammer Lug
First you need to set how early the marker fires in the pull sequence. On all newer models, either with a round hole trigger plate, or hinge trigger, you generally want the marker to release the hammer in the first ¼ of the pull. On the older slotted hole trigger plate, its recommended that the hammer be set to release half way through the pull. To adjust the position of the hammer lug you need to remove the bolt, and insert a 1/8 allen key into the whole in the sight rail. It may take some work to get the allen key to fit into the hammer lug. Don’t get discouraged if it takes you some time to slide the hammer back and forth until you can get the allen key to engage. Once you get the allen key in, you need to either turn it clockwise to make the lug longer, and make the release later in the pull, or turn it counter clockwise to make the lug shorter, and make the release earlier in the pull.



If your cocker was made before 1997, then you will not have the top access hole. If this is the case, then you are going to need to remove the trigger frame to access the lug. Now you turn the lug clockwise to make the marker fire earlier, and counter clockwise to make the marker fire later. It can also be noted that most pro shops can drill the lug access hole for a small fee, which is very worth it. **NOTE: this process only applies if your marker does not have the top access hole.

Actuator Rod
This is probably the most important and most common part of timing. It involves setting the length of the actuator rod to actuate the 3 way at the proper time. This is what controls the re-cocking of the marker. You want the marker to cock long enough after firing to ensure that no air escapes up the feed tube, causing blow back (which increases the chances of chopping). If the marker fires too late in the pull, it wont cock reliably, leading to double feeding, which causes a mess as well. Generally speaking, you want the marker to cock in the last ¼ pull. A good test for blowback, is to place a small square of tissue paper over the feed tube. If it blows in any direction, then there is blow back present, and you need to continue adjusting the distance between the firing portion, and the 3 way actuation. With the popularity of 3-oring style 3 ways (the Bomb, and the PMP 3 ways) and hinge triggers it takes a bit more explaining on how to adjust the 3 way. Find the description of your set up below and follow ONLY those directions.



The first thing people want to know how to do to their autococker is time it. There is always fear and apprehension about the task, which is generally caused by popular misconception. With practice, timing your marker becomes no more difficult than putting on a barrel, or filling a hopper. If you are not familiar with timing your marker, I suggest that you read over the article to the end, and then come back and take it step by step. Its always easier to undertake a task when you know completely what you need to do. While this is a step by step guide to rather conservative timing, you can come back and pick and choose according to your needs at the time, and it will still work.
 

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This is very helpful. I reccomend stickying it.
 
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