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in the PB world HPA/N2 is the new hotness. People talk about the stability, and how it is less affected by temp. changes. Conversely for top tier racing it used to be N2, but now CO2 is the new deal. Teams talk about how stable pressures are at different temperatures. Is CO2 more stable than N2 at lower pressures?

discuss.
 
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CO2 doesn't expand as readily in lower temperatures and that's the issue in paintball in cold weather, so people prefer air or nitrogen. But in chemical terms, yes, CO2 is more stable at lower temperature IF what you seek is keeping it as a liquid under pressure.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What I'm talking about is the gas used for tires. It started with regular air, then N2 came in (you can fill your passenger car tires with N2 now), but now top tier racing teams are using CO2 to fill their tires. Citing that CO2 is more stable in the operating temp. range of their tires. Is it that at higher temps CO2 is more stable than N2, and vice versa for cold temps?
 
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Wouldn't know anything about that, you're talking racing cars... i drive a hyundai getz.
 

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that is pretty crazy. mmm i think the difference is due to the fact that in paintball you are using the gas as a propellant, and in car tires its being used to keep something inflated.

Maybe the CO2 stays more stable in car tires because it's not being realeased in small amounts and can stay together better??? Idk
 

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there's moisture in compressed air which is bad news bears... thus stability. as tires heat up and pressure fluxuations develop, moisture would change the characteristics of the gas.

fatter molecules = less seepage, as kaz may or may not have alluded to.

You wont really notice a difference for your daily driving other than the amount of times you fill up your tires.
 

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if i were racing id think getting a compressor with a dryer on it would have happened years ago, so moisture aside and seepage aside, how does co2 at 50psi or whatever is in racing tires, react different at 150 mph than n2 or air?
 

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co2 is more stable than HPA for tires due to the fact that HPA contains multiple different gases that expand at different rates, therefore the pressure from room temperature to the high ends of what race tires experience (well past 100 degrees) can fluctuate heavily. For instance, as stated earlier, water vapor expands MUCH more at high temperatures. co2 expands VERY little from 0 C up to even 100 C. So co2 is better than HPA. I'm not really sure what makes co2 a better choice than n2. They're both inert, very stable gases that have a VERY low point at which they change form, and expand very little at the temperatures that will be experienced. the only thing off the top of my head is that a co2 molecule is much larger than an n2 molecule.
 

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Co2 is a more dense gas than nitrogen (n2- 1.251g/l)(Co2- 1.98g/l) I believe that since nitrogen has a negative boiling point that co2 is much more stable at the operating temperatures and pressures of an automobile tire.
 

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co2 expands VERY little from 0 C up to even 100 C.
i dont understand this part, because at least in my eyes if it were true there shouldnt be a need for burst disks on co2 tanks, and storing a co2 tank in the sun wouldnt be an issue, and that is not nearly a change of 100C, granted they are at different pressures and maybe thats where this shouldnt apply.

if its more stable its reaction to heat would be more predictable right? i can see that being a plus
 

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i dont understand this part, because at least in my eyes if it were true there shouldnt be a need for burst disks on co2 tanks, and storing a co2 tank in the sun wouldnt be an issue, and that is not nearly a change of 100C, granted they are at different pressures and maybe thats where this shouldnt apply.

if its more stable its reaction to heat would be more predictable right? i can see that being a plus
We're not talking about CO2 which is being forced to stay as a liquid at room temp, as in a pressurized tank. Liquid CO2 is extremely unstable, no matter what temperature it is-- It's the nature of CO2 to sublime directly from a solid to a gas, or vice versa.
 
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