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this is what I'm doing in one of my classes.. a few of you might be familiar with it, symbolic logic.


 
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This is actually a philosophy class, believe it or not.
 
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What is its application?
Deductive Logic. Basically those letters represent premises or propositions. In the first example I was given a set of premises and I had to show how they logically entail that conclusion. You manipulate the premises using basic metarules.

The second example is testing the validity of a conclusion. You show all possible combinations of True or False premises, then work through what's called a truth table and see the results.
 

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Caculus is comming for me, What exactly is Differental Equations?
Pretty sure you are refering to Differentiable Equations. They are simply equations that have a derivative at every point... if you don't know what they are I doubt you will understand that answer rollin:

Smalls--Interesting, I was thinking it was vaguely along those lines. Is its real-world application actually worthwhile or is it rather useless? I have found that theorems like that are either astoundingly accurate or POS.
 
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Smalls--Interesting, I was thinking it was vaguely along those lines. Is its real-world application actually worthwhile or is it rather useless? I have found that theorems like that are either astoundingly accurate or POS.
Our professor is rather incompetent, so I can't really say whether it's that useful or not. We have done very few practical applications.. however, theoretically you could create flawless arguments, just don't ask me how :p
 
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So, its a equation of a equation?
yeah. the simpliest example is a basic linear function.
say you have y=5x+3
the derivative if that is y=5.

this should make sense cuz 5 was the slope of y=5x+3. And the slope is the rate at which y changes in respect to x. and since its a linear function the slope never changes, so its derivative should be a horizon line at y=5.
 

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Pretty sure you are refering to Differentiable Equations. They are simply equations that have a derivative at every point... if you don't know what they are I doubt you will understand that answer rollin:

Smalls--Interesting, I was thinking it was vaguely along those lines. Is its real-world application actually worthwhile or is it rather useless? I have found that theorems like that are either astoundingly accurate or POS.
differential equations is a upper level math class taken after calc 3.
 

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I'd hate to be the Wet Blanket here but that's like pretty basic in any Discrete Math course. Just wait till you get out of the truth table stage and get into the real heavy stuff. Very abstract.
 
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I'd hate to be the Wet Blanket here but that's like pretty basic in any Discrete Math course. Just wait till you get out of the truth table stage and get into the real heavy stuff. Very abstract.
mhm, the course title is Elementary Symbolic Logic, so obviously it's going to be the basics. That doesnt change the fact that this is still pretty bizarre to be encountering for the first time, which is the point of the thread. not trying to brag about how hard a course im in or anything.. cuz I wouldnt be braggin anyways, I dont understand the ****! :p
 

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differential equations is a upper level math class taken after calc 3.
...and its not just a course title. Its a concept used in all of calculus, no doubt it is infinitley more complex at the higher levels, but the theory in its most elementary form is indeed appliable to early calc.

Don't confuse him with incomplete information smalls! :eek: The derivative is notated differently so one knows its a derivative, and thus not simply another function... for your example it would be written y'=5 obviously.

I say this so you don't embarass yourself trying to act smart in calc class. :dodgy:
 
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kinda like the whole "if a=b, and b=c, then a=c"...only on like a whole different plane of difficulty.
Yeah, that example is actually a basic sequent called Hypothetical Syllogism. Basically, if P implies Q and Q implies R, then P implies R. Which is just makes sense right, but to prove that that's a fair logical deduction you can prove it using the basic rules of symbolic logic.

You'd do that by making the assumption P with the purpose of Conditional Proof. Then you use that P to arrive at Q by the basic rule Modus Ponens. Then use that Q to arrive at R, again by Modus Ponens. So by making the assumption P you were able to arrive at R, therefore you've satisfied the conditional proof and can accurately say that P implies R.

But that just proves that it's a well formed formula; it doesn't alway hold true because any of those premises may be false.
 
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